Ruins in Nebra

Memleben Abbey

48 people have been here
2.5/10

Memleben Abbey (German: Kloster Memleben, Reichskloster Memleben) was a Benedictine monastery, now ruined, on the Unstrut in Memleben, in the Burgenlandkreis near Nebra in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany.

History

Pre-dissolution

Memleben acquired considerable importance under the Ottonian Dynasty. Henry I of Germany (whose ancestral estates lay in this area, where he therefore spent much time) was born in Memleben and later greatly enlarged the Kaiserpfalz (villa regia or palace), which became his favourite residence next only to Quedlinburg. He died here of a stroke while hunting in 936. His son Otto I also often stayed in Memleben and issued a number of documents from here.

Otto I died here on 7 May 973 and although his body was buried in Magdeburg, his heart, according to legend, was buried in Memleben. In his memory his son Otto II founded in 975 a Benedictine monastery, which within a short time had become one of the richest and most influential of the Imperial abbeys. Otto II endowed it with several estates and privileges in the present Thuringia, Saxony-Anhalt and Hesse.

In 994 Otto II's son, Otto III, granted the abbey the market, mint and customs rights of Memleben, and even had plans to make it the centre of a projected See of Thuringia, but died aged 22 in Italy before he was able to act on his intention.

In 1015 the golden age of Memleben Abbey ended. Henry II, the successor of Otto III, had confirmed on his accession in 1002 to Abbot Reinhold of Memleben the privileges and possessions of his predecessors, but nevertheless thirteen years later substantially disempowered and dispossessed the community at Memleben in favour of Hersfeld Abbey, to whom he subordinated it, in return for estates for his pet project, the newly created Bishopric of Bamberg. The decline of Memleben Abbey was thus ensured.

In 1525 the abbey was plundered by rebellious peasants and after a steadily worsening decline in the wake of the Reformation it was dissolved in 1548.

Post-dissolution

The abbey's estates were taken over by the Electors of Saxony in 1551 and given to the school at Pforta, which had just been re-founded, and which retained possession of them until the end of World War II.

In 1722 the roof of the former abbey church was struck by lightning and destroyed, and attempts were made later to demolish the rest of the building, although the remaining ruins are still of interest, particularly the crypt.

The other monastic buildings were given during the period of the DDR after World War II to an agricultural collective, who made considerable alterations to them. They now house a permanent exhibition relating to the history of the abbey and the town.

Sources / External links

References

  • Andert, Reinhold, 1995: Von Ritteburg nach Memleben in Der Thüringer Königshort. Querfurt: Dingsda-Verlag. ISBN 3-928498-45-2
  • Größler, Hermann, nd: Führer durch das Unstruttal von Artern nach Naumburg, reprinted by Dingsda-Verlag, Querfurt, 1995. ISBN 3-928498-04-5
  • Kühnlenz, Fritz, 1992: Städte und Burgen an der Unstrut, 1st edition. Greifenverlag. ISBN 3-7352-0293-4 (also special edition, 1999, Verlagshaus Thüringen, ISBN 3896831216)
  • Wittmann, Helge, 2001: Memleben: Königspfalz - Reichskloster - Probstei. Imhof Petersberg. ISBN 3932526929
Categories:
Post a comment
Tips & Hints
Arrange By:
Lara Rubisch
18 July 2019
A place to definitely stop by. Quiet and beautiful gardens filled with history!
Mario Winkler
30 September 2012
... sehr empfehlenswert !
Load more comments
foursquare.com
Location
Map
Address

0.4km from K2646, Naturpark Saale-Unstrut-Triasland, 06642 Nebra, Germany

Get directions
References

Kloster und Kaiserpfalz Memleben on Foursquare

Memleben Abbey on Facebook

Hotels nearby

See all hotels See all
Berghotel Zum Edelacker

starting $87

Hotel Himmelsscheibe

starting $63

Hotel Schloss Nebra

starting $68

Berghotel Wilhelmsburg

starting $87

Ringhotel Mutiger Ritter

starting $127

Hotel Unstruttal

starting $107

Recommended sights nearby

See all See all
Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Sittichenbach Abbey
Germany

Sittichenbach Abbey (Kloster Sittichenbach), sometimes also known as

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Rudelsburg
Germany

The castle ruin Rudelsburg lies on the east bank of the river Saale

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Naumburg Cathedral
Germany

The Naumburger Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul, located in

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Goseck circle
Germany

The Goseck circle is a Neolithic structure in Goseck in the

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Europa-Rosarium
Germany

The Europa-Rosarium (12.5 hectares), formerly the Rosarium

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Merseburg Cathedral
Germany

Merseburg Cathedral (German: Merseburger Dom) is a cathedral in

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Schloss Tiefurt
Germany

Schloss Tiefurt is a small castle on the Ilm in the Tiefurt quarter of

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Mansfeld Castle
Germany

Mansfeld Castle (German: Schloss Mansfeld) is a castle in the

Similar tourist attractions

See all See all
Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Clonmacnoise
Ireland

The monastery of Clonmacnoise (Cluain Mhic Nóis in Irish, meaning

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Inis Cathaig
Ireland

Inis Cathaig or Scattery Island is an island in the Shannon estuary.

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Skellig Michael
Germany

Skellig Michael (from Sceilig Mhichíl in the Irish language, meaning

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Kells Priory
Ireland

Kells Priory is one of the largest and most impressive medieval

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Sutro Baths
United States

The Sutro Baths were a large, privately owned swimming pool complex in

See all similar places