World Heritage Sites in Gorée

Gorée

58,884 people have been here
8.7/10

Île de Gorée (i.e. "Gorée Island"; (French pronunciation: ]) is one of the 19 communes d'arrondissement (i.e. "commune of arrondissement") of the city of Dakar, Senegal. It is a 0.182 square kilometres (45 acres) island located 2 kilometres (1.1 nmi; 1.2 mi) at sea from the main harbor of Dakar ().

Its population as of 31 January 2005 official estimates is 1,056 inhabitants, giving a density of 5,802 inh. per km² (15,028 inh. per sq. mile), which is only half the average density of the city of Dakar. Gorée is both the smallest and the least populated of the 19 communes d'arrondissement of Dakar.

Gorée is famous as a destination for people interested in the Atlantic slave trade. In fact, however, relatively few slaves were processed or transported from there. The more important centers for the slave trade from Senegal were north, at Saint-Louis, Senegal or to the south in the Gambia, at the mouths of major rivers for trade.

History and slave trade

Gorée is a small island 900 m in length and 350 m in width sheltered by the Cape Vert Peninsula. Now part of the city of Dakar, it was a minor port and site of European settlement along the coast. Being almost devoid of drinking water, the island was not settled before the arrival of Europeans. The Portuguese were the first to establish a presence on Gorée (c. 1450), where they built a small stone chapel and used land as a cemetery.

Gorée is known as the location of the House of Slaves (French: Maison des esclaves), built by an Afro-French Métis family about 1780–1784. The House of Slaves is one of the oldest houses on the island. It is now used as a tourist destination to show the horrors of the slave trade throughout the Atlantic world.

Gorée was actually relatively unimportant in the slave trade. The claim that the "house of slaves" was a slave-shipping point was refuted in 1959 by Raymond Mauny, who shortly afterward was appointed the first professor of African history at the Sorbonne.)]] Probably no more than a few hundred slaves a year departed from here for transportation to the Americas. They were more often incidental passengers on ships carrying other cargoes rather than transported on slave ships. After the decline of the slave trade from Senegal in the 1770s and 1780s, the town became an important port for the shipment of peanuts, peanut oil, gum arabic, ivory, and other products of the "legitimate" trade. It was probably in relation to this trade that the Maison des Esclaves was built.

The island of Gorée was one of the first places in Africa to be settled by Europeans, the Portuguese setting foot on the island in 1444. It was captured by the United Netherlands in 1588, then the Portuguese again, again the Dutch — who named it after the Dutch island of Goeree, and the British took it over under Robert Holmes in 1664.

After the French gained control in 1677, the island remained continuously French, with brief periods of British occupation during the various wars fought by France and Britain, until 1960, when Senegal was granted independence. The island was notably taken and occupied by the British between 1758 and 1763 following the Capture of Gorée and wider Capture of Senegal during the Seven Years War before being returned to France at the Treaty of Paris.

Gorée was principally a trading post, administratively attached to Saint-Louis, capital of the Colony of Senegal. Apart from slaves, beeswax, hides and grain were also traded. The population of the island fluctuated according to circumstances, from a few hundred free Africans and Creoles to about 1,500. There would have been few European residents at any one time.

In the 18th and 19th century, Gorée was home to a Franco-African Creole, or Métis, community of merchants with links to similar communities in Saint-Louis and the Gambia, and across the Atlantic to France's colonies in the Americas. Métis women, called signares from the Portuguese senhora, were especially important to the city’s business life. The signares owned ships and property and commanded male clerks. They were also famous for cultivating fashion and entertainment. One such signare, Anne Rossignol, lived in Saint-Domingue (the modern Haiti) in the 1780s before the Haitian Revolution.

, Jacobus van der, 1715–1779. Island of Gorée and its fortifications]] In February 1794 during the French Revolution, France was the first nation in the world to abolish slavery. The slave trade from Senegal stopped. However, in May 1802 Napoleon reestablished slavery after intense lobbying from sugar plantation owners of the Caribbean départements of France. The wife of Napoleon, Joséphine de Beauharnais, daughter of a rich plantation owner from Martinique, supported their position.

In March 1815, during his political comeback known as the Hundred Days, Napoleon definitively abolished the slave trade to build relations with Great Britain. (Scotland had never recognized slavery and England finally abolished the slave trade in 1807.) This time, abolition continued.

As the trade in slaves declined in the late eighteenth century, Gorée converted to legitimate commerce. The tiny city and port were ill situated for the shipment of industrial quantities of peanuts, which began arriving in bulk from the mainland. Consequently, its merchants established a presence directly on the mainland, first in Rufisque (1840) and then in Dakar (1857). Many of the established families started to leave the island.

Civic franchise for the citizens of Gorée was institutionalized in 1872, when it became a French “commune” with an elected mayor and a municipal council. Blaise Diagne, the first African deputy elected to the French National Assembly (served 1914 to 1934), was born on Gorée. From a peak of about 4,500 in 1845, the population fell to 1,500 in 1904. In 1940 Gorée was annexed to the municipality of Dakar.

Gorée is connected to the mainland by regular 30-minute ferry service, for pedestrians only; there are no cars on the island. It is Senegal’s premier tourist site and became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1978. It now serves mostly as a memorial to the slave trade. Many of the historic commercial and residential buildings have been turned into restaurants and hotels.

Administration

With the foundation of Dakar in 1857, Gorée gradually lost its importance. In 1872, the French colonial authorities created the two communes of Saint-Louis and Gorée, the first western-style municipalities in West Africa, with the same status as any commune in France. Dakar, on the mainland, was part of the commune of Gorée, whose administration was located on the island. However, as early as 1887, Dakar was detached from the commune of Gorée and was turned into a commune in its own right. Thus, the commune of Gorée became limited to its tiny island.

In 1891, Gorée still had 2,100 inhabitants, while Dakar only had 8,737 inhabitants. However, by 1926 the population of Gorée had declined to only 700 inhabitants, while the population of Dakar had increased to 33,679 inhabitants. Thus, in 1929 the commune of Gorée was merged with Dakar. The commune of Gorée disappeared, and Gorée was now only a small island of the commune of Dakar.

In 1996, a massive reform of the administrative and political divisions of Senegal was voted by the Parliament of Senegal. The commune of Dakar, deemed too large and too populated to be properly managed by a central municipality, was divided into 19 communes d'arrondissement to which extensive powers were given. The commune of Dakar was maintained above these 19 communes d'arrondissement. It coordinates the activities of the communes d'arrondissement, much as Greater London coordinates the activities of the London boroughs.

Thus, in 1996 the commune of Gorée was resurrected, although it is now only a commune d'arrondissement (but in fact with powers quite similar to a commune). The new commune d'arrondissement of Gorée, which is officially known in French as the Commune d'Arrondissement de l'île de Gorée, took possession of the old mairie (town hall) in the center of the island. This had been used as the mairie of the former commune of Gorée between 1872 and 1929.

The commune d'arrondissement of Gorée is ruled by a municipal council (conseil municipal) democratically elected every 5 years, and by a mayor elected by members of the municipal council.

The current mayor of Gorée is Augustin Senghor, elected in 2002.

Island historical sites

Other attractions on the island include three museums, one dedicated to women, one to the history of Senegal and one to the sea. The seventeenth century Gorée Police Station, Gorée Castle and a small beach are also of interest to tourists.

The island is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Archaeological research on the historical occupation of Gorée has been recently undertaken by Dr. Ibrahima Thiaw (Associate Professor of Archaeology at the Institut Fondamental d'Afrique Noire (IFAN); and the University Cheikh Anta Diop of Dakar, Senegal); Dr. Susan Keech McIntosh (Professor of Archaeology, Rice University, Houston, Texas); and Raina Croff (PhD candidate at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut). Dr. Shawn Murray (University of Wisconsin–Madison) also contributed to the archaeological research at Gorée through a study of local and introduced trees and shrubs, which aids in identifying the ancient plant remains found in the excavations.

Notable residents

  • Father of French rapper Booba (born Elie Yaffa). In his song "Garde la pêche" he mentions the island, saying "Gorée c'est ma terre" (Gorée is my land/hometown). Also, in his song "0.9," he says "A dix ans j'ai vu Gorée, depuis mes larmes sont eternelles" (When I was 10 I saw Gorée, since then my tears have been eternal."
  • Djembe musician Latyr Sy.
  • Kora musician and djeli or griot Karamo Cissokho

References in popular culture

Gorée Island has been featured in many songs, due to its history related to the slave trade.

The following songs have significant references to Gorée Island:

  • Steel Pulse - "Door Of No Return"
  • Doug E. Fresh - "Africa"
  • Akon - "Senegal"
  • Burning Spear - "One Africa"
  • Alpha Blondy - "Goree (Senegal)"

In 2007 the Swiss director Pierre-Yves Borgeaud made a documentary called Retour à Gorée (Return to Gorée).

References

  • Camara, Abdoulaye & Joseph Roger de Benoïst. Histoire de Gorée, Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose, 2003

External links

Categories:
Post a comment
Tips & Hints
Arrange By:
H Hunt
8 December 2012
The House of Slaves is closed noon til 2:30
laurine ancelle
14 November 2015
La plage visiter le castel et la maison des esclaves et il y a des restau qui font de très bons repas
Load more comments
foursquare.com
Location
Map
Address

0.1km from Rue du castel, Dakar, Senegal

Get directions
References

Island of Gorée on Foursquare

Gorée on Facebook

Hotels nearby

See all hotels See all
Pullman Dakar Teranga

starting $241

Novotel Dakar

starting $175

Hotel Lagon 2

starting $164

Fleur de Lys Plateau

starting $96

Ibis Dakar

starting $110

Hôtel & Restaurant Farid

starting $85

Recommended sights nearby

See all See all
Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Kathedrale von Dakar
Senegal

Kathedrale von Dakar (Français: Cathédrale du Souvenir africain de D

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
IFAN Museum of African Arts
Senegal

The Musée de l'Institut Fondamental d'Afrique Noire or IFAN Museum of

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
African Renaissance Monument
Senegal

The African Renaissance Monument is a bronze statue under construction

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Lake Retba
Senegal

Lake Retba or Lac Rose lies north of the Cap Vert peninsula of

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Dakar Grand Mosque
Senegal

The Dakar Grand Mosque (also Grande Mosquée de Dakar) is one of the

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Mosquée de la Divinité
Senegal

Mosquée de la Divinité is a tourist attraction, one of the Mosques i

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Arch 22
Gambia

Arch 22 is a commemorative arch on the road into Banjul in The Gambia.

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Faidherbe Bridge
Senegal

Faidherbe Bridge is a road bridge over the Sénégal River which links t

Similar tourist attractions

See all See all
Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Meteora
Greece

The Metéora (Ελληνικά. Μετέωρα, 'suspended rocks', 'suspended in t

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Old City (Baku)
Azerbaijan

Old City or Inner City (Azerbaijani: İçəri Şəhər) is the ancient histo

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Loggia dei Lanzi
Italy

The Loggia dei Lanzi, also called the Loggia della Signoria, is a

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Geirangerfjord
Norway

The Geiranger fjord (Geirangerfjorden) is a fjord in the Sunnmøre

Add to wishlist
I've been here
Visited
Naqsh-e Jahan Square
Iran

Naghsh-e Jahan Square (Persian: ميدان نقش جهان maidaan-e naqsh-e jeh

See all similar places